Love the Look: Reclaimed Wood

 

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Reclaimed wood gives an interior space texture, warmth and interest but it also charms us with its aged and honest look. Even better, reclaimed wood has a history. Was it at one point in time a part of the structure of a barn? Perhaps a boxcar? One thing’s for sure… There’s something romantic about a material that tells a story of the past.

 

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Oftentimes, reclaimed wood is known for its durability and therefore can be quite expensive. Wood that won’t rot and perish typically needs to be seasoned, air-dried and sometimes dried in a kiln. If you’re looking for highly durable wood you might seek out Longleaf Pine or Hard Maple. On a rare occasion, you may come across American Chestnut wood, which in the past was devastated by the chestnut blight, a fungal disease that wiped out almost all of the American Chestnut population in the early 1900s. This type of wood is extremely expensive and would cost you a pretty penny. Of course it’s possible to find wood at low prices, but you have to be willing to look for it. Commercial woodworking firms, lumber mills and lumber yards may be good places to go. Excavators and remolding contractors may be willing and able to give away lumber for free.

 

In the past few years, reclaimed and recycled wood has become a popular trend due to its eco-friendly nature, unique appearance and ability to look great in just about any given space. Its features look lovely accompanying industrial, cottage, and even modern styles. We’ve been seeing the look in residential design with tables, cabinets, doors, walls, countertops and flooring; however, we’re also seeing it and installing it in commercial spaces too.

 

In 2014, we installed reclaimed wood at VerHalen Commercial Interiors’ Appleton location. Check out the following images of the space, adorned with handsome weathered wood.

 

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The weathered look of reclaimed wood has grown immensely popular. We’re seeing many new and innovate products inspired by its beauty. One product in particular is Stikwood, the world’s first “Peel & Stik” reclaimed and sustainable wood planking. Founded in 2012 by Jerry and Laura McCall, the company brings the look of wood planking with ease and cost-effectiveness. Stikwood comes in a variety of styles and finishes. It’s an inventive product that reinforces the idea that reclaimed wood is definitely one of the hottest trends in interior design right now.

 

 

Nowadays, we’re seeing a plethora of materials that are made to mimic the look of reclaimed wood. We’re talking wallcovering, ceramic tiles, vinyl flooring, laminate and even carpet. It’s fascinating how authentic these products look!

 

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Daltile’s Season Wood ColorBody™ Porcelain

Daltile does the appearance of weathered wood wonderfully with ceramic tile.

 

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MDC Wallcoverings’ Craftsman Pattern from their Restoration Elements Collection

Stunning vertical wood grain vinyl from MDC Wallcovering.

 

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Patcraft’s Luxury Vinyl Tile from their Timber Grove Collection

Luxury vinyl tile flooring from Patcraft.

 

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York Wallcoverings’ Wood wallpaper from their Weathered Finishes Collection

York Wallcoverings does a gorgeous wallpaper that imitates weathered wood.

 

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Interface’s carpet from their Near & Far collection

Commercial carpet from Interface‘s Near & Far Collection.

 

We’re currently working on a couple projects that will feature weathered wood. Once they have been completed, we will be sure to post photos of the gorgeous work!